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HomeHomeTeachersTeachersLyle RonglienLyle RonglienGetting A Good ToneGetting A Good Tone
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7/18/2006 1:27 PM
 
well its like lyle was saying. once you get things set up, and then get comfortable with your guitar, you can practice making patterns and such. after some hard practice, you learn a few things you like. then you can combine bits and peices of one pattern with another that might go well with it. soon you gain the ability to decide a sound in your head and then make it happen on your instrument. and the joy of making different cool sounds in any combination you choose at will is so cool. after playing for a while you will learn the rock sounds and the blues sounds and then the country sounds. then you learn what scales and areas on the neck go with others. and what chords go well with others as well as what order they sound good in. basicly if you keep taking lessons and keep practicing often, you learn to make what ever sound fits your mood. and being able to play different sounds at will is really cool. who knows you could end up being the next rev willie and make up your own sound. tone- you make it up in your head, make it come out with your fingers, and then spice it up with effects if you want. one thing for sure - dont be afraid to take lessons and ask questions. and practice, practice, practice.

Brent
 
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7/18/2006 2:20 PM
 
bmw863,where did you find this book or what site do I go to to find something like that.Thanks, Tommy

Tommy
 
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7/18/2006 2:45 PM
 
I'm not sure what book he has, but here is a link to some free set-up info.


Set-up guide




 
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7/18/2006 3:54 PM
 
Everyone,

Here is a simple way for beginners to determine if they need a set-up.

First piece of advice, if you don't know what you are doing take it to a pro, you could damage your guitar.

Tune your guitar first, preferably with new strings...for the purpose of accuracy use a tuner if you have one, if not, borrow a friends or see if you can find a free computer based one on the Internet.

Play a natural harmonic on fret 12. It should be bang on with the open E, the tuner will show you how much you are out.

Then play the high E note on the 12 fret.

To the best of my limited knowledge, if these two are not the same, your guitar needs to be adjusted.

Your guitar may still sound good to you and only be out slightly, that's why it's good to use an electronic or computer tuner instead of relying on your hearing.

I had my newest guitar set-up about 6 months ago and I did this test earlier today.

My high E string at the 12th fret tone is sharp by about 5 db or whatever those numbers mean on the tuner. This is likely due to the hours and hours of daily use this guitar gets from me.

To make a long story short, good tone is important...so, back to the shop she goes for another set-up.

 
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7/18/2006 7:03 PM
 
Thanks

Tommy
 
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HomeHomeTeachersTeachersLyle RonglienLyle RonglienGetting A Good ToneGetting A Good Tone


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