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4/11/2003 9:21 AM
 
I hope I'm not wearing out my welcome with all these theory questions...but, here goes...

A while back I asked Michael how one could tell if a scale would work in a certain key/chord progression/etc...using the harmonic minor as an example of a scale I couldn't place. He basically told me that as long as you leave the root, 3rd and 5th more or less 'alone'...the other scale tones act more as colors and won't necessarily sound 'off' if they're not part of the overlying scale that the key is in. So...I do notice that in the blues, quite often one will solo in an overlying minor key...over a quite major progression. Lyle just recently did an online lesson using G major as the key center for the riff. It used a progression of G7, C9, D9....all major, so I'm assuming the general key center as G major...so how could one play the G minor blues/pentatonic scale over it and have it sound ok? I tried myself and it certainly sounds fine to me...different than a major pentatonic of course...but no dissonant. Does it have something to do with it being a pentatonic scale? I'm just a tad confused because G major and G minor certainly differ in the 3rd, which I thought would make the scale generallty unplayable. Thanks in advance.
Sorry if this is too annoying of a question, ;)
Jalle
 
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4/11/2003 11:19 AM
 
Perhaps I shouldn't be the one answering this, but that has never stopped me before. I can think of Eric Clapton's "Crossroads." He switches between Amaj and Amin. First off, if you are playing Roots and Fifths (power chords), you can play major or minor sclaes over it because you don't have a 3rd to interfere.

Moreover, if you are playing over a G-C-D progression, you can play a G scale ove rthe entire piece, but you can also play over the C (or the D) out of that scale if the notes are not dissonant to the C (or the D).

I am sure somebody could write a whole bunch more. Perhaps you need to ask a teacher in another lesson.

Ebony 2002 Gibson Les Paul Standard | Guild F4CE Acoustic | BOSS GT-6 | No Amp!
 
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4/11/2003 1:16 PM
 
It was a valient attempt, I thank you for the effort :)
 
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4/20/2003 1:11 AM
 
Akara, I think the G minor might sound good because it consists of the same notes as the A major(or another major. I know all Major keys have realtive minors, but I can't be sure if this is the right pair). I asked Lyle (in his forum section under the topic soloing) about switching between A minor blues and A major blues scales within the same solo. Maybe when he answers that question it may help you.

Gibson Les Paul Melody Maker|Mexican Made Squier Strat by Fender for Slide|3 Acoustics|Digitech RPX400 Modeling Processor/Effects|2 Marshal Amps
Rob
 
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4/20/2003 9:15 AM
 
Yeah, G minor is A major. I'll check that out when he answers, thanks.
 
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