Register   Login
  Browse    Private Lessons    Forum
HomeHomeGeneralGeneralEquipmentEquipmentEar training / TranscribingEar training / Transcribing
Previous
 
Next
New Post
11/14/2007 1:12 PM
 
Hi, I have come to realise that developing your ear is a key skill for learning to play the guitar. To some extent it comes with practicing your instrument and becoming familiar with it, but I have noticed some people pick this up easily while other struggle. I wondered if any of you had any tips that you'd care to share?

A related skill that is useful is the ability to transcribe i.e. to listen to a tune & be able to write it down/play it.

I found several books, CDs & software on ear training.
http://astore.amazon.co.uk/mrmusic-21

I have heard that headphones help with transcribing, allowing you to focus on the tune moreblue

Brian Robertson,Page,Santana,Clapton,King,King,King,Scott Gorham,Berry,Waters,Hendrix,Kossof,Vai
 
New Post
11/24/2007 7:28 AM
 
Quote:
I found several: books, CDs & software on ear training.
http://astore.amazon.co.uk/mrmusic-21

I have heard that headphones help with transcribing, allowing you to focus on the tune.




Also, have any of you tried the much advertised Perfect Pitch course? I got it as, coincidently, did a colleague. I have mixed feelings about the product:

Pros:
- Well thought out
- Professionally produced
- I managed a small amount of success
- the basic principles are quite well explained
- the author is obviously knowledgeable and passionate about ear training.
- probably best for a musician with a fair amount of experience already.
- prob. good for serious music students looking to develop their ear as part of their formal music education

Cons:
- Better off to start with Relative pitch*
- long, & long winded -- perhaps it has to be
- it is not a quick solution ... it takes a lot of time (although if you already have some abilities in this area or good relative pitch you'll make faster progress)
- not cheap
- you are not supposed to move on from an exercise until you have mastered it (which is well defined). In practice, you may take years to complete the course or might never finish it. Regular sessions is probably key.
- piano-based although you are encourage to use your own instrument and a partner for some exercises - which will not always be practical.

*This was probably the wrong product for me: Relative Pitch (rather than perfect pitch) is more useful and easier to learn. It also helps with perfect pitch - so probably best to start with a Relative Pitch course, either from the same author or one of the books/CDs on the link above or using some of the excellent shareware software out there. Some of the software is amazingly good for this sort of repetitive practice, adapting to your improving abilities and detecting and working on weaknesses.

Brian Robertson,Page,Santana,Clapton,King,King,King,Scott Gorham,Berry,Waters,Hendrix,Kossof,Vai
 
New Post
5/8/2008 5:50 PM
 
Quote: I have heard that headphones help with transcribing, allowing you to focus on the tune moreblue


Yes, I completely agree with the headphones. You can also hear little nuances that are difficult to pick out with regular speakers. Plus you can transcribe late into the night without waking the wife. :)
 
Previous
 
Next
HomeHomeGeneralGeneralEquipmentEquipmentEar training / TranscribingEar training / Transcribing


Support    About Us    Join the Mailing List    Teachers Wanted
Copyright (c) 2019 Riff Interactive   Terms Of Use  Privacy Statement