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Lyle Ronglien >> Beginning Guitar III - Simple Chords >>


Beginning Guitar III - Lesson 1

Open Position Dominant Chords

Lyle: Before you start with this lesson, please check your tuning:

check your tuning

Lyle: In the past few lessons you have learned the basic open position major and minor chords. Now it's time to learn the "dominant 7" chords in the open position.

Lyle: The "dominant" chord has a bluesy sound to it compared to the other major and minor type of chords.

Lyle: Start by learning the A7:

A7


A7

Lyle: Here's a picking pattern to try with this chord. The "v" means down stroke with the pick, the "^" is an up stroke:

A7 picking pattern

A7 picking pattern

Lyle: The "dominant" type of chord is made from a major triad (1 - 3 - 5) followed with a flatted 7th (b7) degree. You don't need to know this but that's the musical theory of the chord. Impress your friends with this knowledge ;-)

Lyle: Here's a looping jam track of a drum beat you can use as a sort of metronome to practice the picking pattern with:

metronome drum track

Lyle: Don't worry if the theory and terminology throws you off, just memorize what you're playing for now.

Lyle: Next is the C7 chord:


C7


C7

Lyle: Here's a picking pattern you can use to practice the C7 chord with:

C7 picking pattern

C7 picking pattern

Lyle: Remember to follow the correct pick direction so that you learn to sound smooth and even with these simple picking patterns.

Lyle: Next is the D7 chord which only uses 4 strings, just like the D and Dm chords:

D7


D7

Lyle: Now try this picking pattern I made for the D7 chord:

D7 picking pattern

D7 picking pattern

Lyle: Remember you can use the looping jam track of the basic drum beat to practice keeping a steady beat with.

Lyle: Now a big 6 string chord, the E7:

E7


E7

Lyle: Here's a picking pattern for you to try with the E7:

E7 picking pattern

E7 picking pattern

Lyle: I find it difficult to get the open 4th string to ring clearly. This is an important note because it is the "flatted 7th" degree and the reason why the E7 chord sounds bluesy.

Lyle: Try to get your 2nd finger to roll up on its tip and out of the way of the open 4th string when playing this E7 chord.

Lyle: Last but not least, the G7 chord:

G7


G7

Lyle: Now try this picking pattern for the G7 chord:

G7 picking pattern

G7 picking pattern

Lyle: Now I've put together a 8 measure progression using these dominant 7 chords. Notice how "bluesy" they all sound. You'll use the strum pattern that you used from the last couple of lessons. Here's the chord progression

blues chord progression


blues progression

blues progression

Lyle: Learn how to play that progression all the way through and be able to repeat it. Here's a blues drum beat to help you keep a steady beat with:

blues drum track

Lyle: That's your goal for this lesson, to be able to play this blues progression a few times through with the jam track.

Lyle: Any questions?

sammy_andrews: Yes, what scales would you use to play over these dominant chords??

Lyle: Well, there are so many to choose from. I would use the diminished/whole tone scale also known as the Phrygian Dominant. You could use the minor pentatonic for a real bluesy sound or try the Mixolydian mode for a melodic sound. More about scales in the near future....stay tuned!

sammy_andrews: Ok thanks,... I was just trying to think if minor or major scales would work over dominant chords..is all

Lyle: good question though...

sammy_andrews: I'm not trying to get ahead of you,,, was just wondering... :o)

david_reid: what's the difference between Phrygian and Phrygian dominant?

Lyle: Scales are a whole 'nother beast to deal with. We must first learn to walk before we can run...grasshopper.

david_reid: hahaha

sammy_andrews: yes master ...lol

Lyle: ;-)

Joel: :)

Lyle:  Let's take a break for now. Thanks everyone for being here live tonight and for your good questions. We'll work on scales soon enough. That's all for this lesson. Have fun, practice hard, and see you at the next lesson!

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