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Storm Stenvold >> Intervallic Guitar >>
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Teacher: Hi everyone. More 'Intervallic Guitar' tonight.

Lesson Jam Track

Teacher: To recap, we defined intervals as the distance between two notes. We name them using the major scale.

C Major Scale - Single String and in Position


Teacher: A little Latin flavor for the jam track tonight.

Teacher: The progression uses all chords with notes from the C major scale so it will work nicely for our examples.

Jam Track Chords


Teacher: Here are the chords for the progression

Teacher: Fret all five strings from the start. Use the right hand to bring out the different strings.

Teacher: So, back to our Major Scale example. Root note to the 2nd tone = 2nd interval. Root note to 3rd tone = 3rd interval. Etc.

Teacher: However, there are other intervals within the octave than are named by the Major scale.

Teacher: These are Chromatic intervals. By raising or lowering notes of the Major Scale we get these.

Teacher: Here are these pairs of notes.

Chromatic Intervals - Unison to Octave


Ralph: File stated it was corrupt. Played back fine, but on load there was a 'Tab File Corrupt' Error dialog

Support: you can ignore it, it still works

Teacher: Now we can name all our distances within an octave. As the neck shows, usually we just say flat 5, sharp 4 (b5,#4).

Teacher: There are correct terms for these Chromatic intervals. Just as we say last week there are Major and Perfect intervals within the scale.

Teacher: These Chromatic intervals are Minor, Diminished and Augmented. They follow a naming convention.
Interval Naming


Teacher: If a Major intervals is lowered a 1/2 step it is then called Minor. ie: Major 3rd becomes Minor 3rd.

Teacher: Perfect and Major intervals raised a 1/2 step become Augmented. ie: Perfect 4th becomed Augmented 4th.

Teacher: Perfect or Minor intervals lowered a 1/2 step become Diminished. ie: Perfect 5th becomes Diminised 5th

Teacher: These intervals exist within the Major scale. For instance the distance between the 2nd note of the scale and the 4th is a Minor 3rd rather than a Major 3rd.

Teacher: This is important to work out as we will try some patterns and licks, trying to keep them 'in key'.

Diatonic vs. Parallel Intervals


Teacher:
Here are two interval approaches with 3rds. The first parent of the tab uses 3rds staying in the parent C major scale. Called 'Diatonic'

Teacher: I notice a mistake. 3rd pair in on the 3rd string should be 9th fret

Teacher: The second half uses the same interval of a Major 3rd throughout. Notice how this ends up adding notes outside of the scale as a result.

Parallel Intervals over Jam Track

Teacher: This would be called a Parallel interval approach

Teacher: Here are two samples over the jam track. Notice the difference in sound

Diatonic Intervals over Jam Track

Teacher: The Parallel tend to sound out, Diatonic more smooth and 'inside' or 'in Key'

Teacher: Because of this the rest of the example tonight will focus on keep our interval patterns diatonic.

Teacher: On a later lesson we will exploit the particular sound of parallel intervals.

C Major Scale - 8th Position with scale tones


Teacher: Here is a C major scale pattern for most of the licks that follow.

C Major Scale - 8th Position

Teacher: A very usable and popular sound is that of 3rd intervals.

Teacher: Here are melodic 3rd intervals worked ascending through this scale pattern.

3rd Intervals - Ascending


Teacher: The idea is starting on the root - play its 3rd interval. Next play the 2nd tone - play its 3rd interval. And so on up the scale.

Teacher: Is it clear how we got the pattern?

Teacher: Good.

Teacher: Here is the same pattern in the descending direction

Sound Clip 5

3rd Intervals - Descending


Teacher: These two would be the most common. Interval going up as the lick goes up. Interval going down as the lick goes down

Teacher: But try these other two as well. Interval going down as the melodic line goes up.

Descending Interval - Ascending Line


Teacher: And interval going up as the melodic line goes does down

Ascending Interval - Desceding Line


Teacher: Fourth intervals are particularly challeging to play because so many of the string changes use notes at the same fret as the previous note

4th Intervals - Ascending


4th Intervals

Teacher: I will add the videos for all the licks to the archive. Here is one for the fouths

Teacher: Try it as I showed with the 3rds. Descending - interval down, line up - interval up, line down

Teacher: Also try to work out these patterns 'up the neck' as well as 'across the neck'.

'5th's Lick' Ascending Neck


Teacher: Here is a lick using 5th intervals going up the neck.

Teacher: Notice its mix of ascending and descending 5ths as the line as a whole keeps going up.

'5th's Lick' Ascending Neck

Teacher: The same lick could be played across the neck, or in position.

'5th's Lick' Across Neck


Teacher: As the intervals get wider this makes for some interesting and difficult picking patterns.

Teacher: Great work if you think you can cruise through your Major scales with the metronome at maximum.

'5th's Lick' Across Neck

6th Intervals - Ascending


dom: lol, no chance

Teacher: All with practice. And the last pattern tonight is in 6th intervals.

Teacher: Very melodic to. Notice that a 3rd + a 6th gets you an octave. This relationship names them as inverted intervals

Teacher: The will share a similar sound. 4th + 5ths the same. As are 2nd + 7th intervals.

6th Intervals

Teacher: Lots of work here. I'll leave to you guys to explore the 7th interval and octave patterns

Teacher: Have a great week. Maybe some application of intervals to our chord work and rhythm guitar next time

dom: yes, I will review it all again

Ron: thanks for the lesson

bart: thanks teacher, good lesson

Teacher: You're welcome

bart: I learned a lot today

Stratman: thanks

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